DSL blog

Digital Scholarship: Old School Methods and New School Tools.

Share This: By Rebekah Silverstein, Graduate Student, School of Library and Information Studies Voguish terminology is abundant in academic librarianship, especially when referring to words about learning. Academic scholars are qualified to incorporate compound words to express what they mean. By tacking together familiar words, like digital hygiene, digital literacy, and digital scholarship, for example, scholars generate innovative ways to communicate. “inventing new words helps us to grab people’s attention and get them to focus on what you’re saying”. Erin McKean. Lexicographer, TedYouth2014 Digital Scholarship (DS) is an expression that… Read More »Digital Scholarship: Old School Methods and New School Tools.

Using the DSL: From the Perspective of a PhD Student

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Share This: By Michelle BuschDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of Oklahoma When I started my PhD, I assumed my dissertation would be entirely focused on the ecology of rivers. However, I have sinced joined the National Research Traineeship (NRT) program supported by the National Science Foundation through the Oklahoma Biological Survey and Aeroecology. This program focuses on introducing students to interdisciplinary science while working on an interdisciplinary team. These courses not only got me to think about broadening my research but also prepared me for working with my advisor… Read More »Using the DSL: From the Perspective of a PhD Student

John Steinbeck’s America

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By Sarah Pugachev, Digital Scholarship Librarian At the Digital Scholarship Lab, we love working with faculty to incorporate digital humanities tools into their courses. Which is why we were ecstatic back in Spring 2017, when David Wrobel, Dean of OU College of Arts and Sciences, David L. Boren Professor, and Merrick Chair of Western American History, invited us to participate his class entitled “John Steinbeck’s America.” Working closely with David and our subject librarians, Laurie Scrivener and Liorah Golomb, we developed two distinct DH components of the course that fit… Read More »John Steinbeck’s America

Featured DH’er: Chelsea Smith-Antonides

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Share This: Chelsea Smith-Antonides is one of the DSL’s Summer History Interns. Read more about her experiences below and check out her final project Soviet Deportation: The Forced Deportations and Ethnic Cleansing under Stalin. I’m a recent graduate with a degree in both Russian and History, so this summer I really wanted to incorporate both of these fields into a single research project in the DSL. I decided to focus on Stalin’s forced deportations and ethnic cleansing in the Soviet Union. This was a topic that I’ve been wanting to learn… Read More »Featured DH’er: Chelsea Smith-Antonides

Featured DH’er – Wendy Jordan

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Share This: Each month the Digital Scholarship Lab highlights a campus colleague who is working on a digital humanities project.  Hi Wendy, So what degree are you pursuing and what are your research interests (both related to your degree and otherwise)? I am currently a Senior Undergraduate History Major, with plans to pursue a MA degree in Museum Studies afterword. I have a particular interest in Medieval England and Scandinavia. I enjoy these periods as a whole, but if I had to narrow it down further, I’d say I particularly… Read More »Featured DH’er – Wendy Jordan

Featured DH’er

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Share This: Each month the Digital Scholarship Lab highlights a campus colleague who is working on a digital humanities project.  Hi Paul, Thanks for being our first feature interview! What degree are you pursuing and what are your research interests?  I’m currently a Master’s student in the Department of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine. My thesis work investigates the effects of Green Revolution agricultural technologies and policies on indigenous and campesino/a Mexican farmers and seeks to understand the relationship between development/aid programs devised and executed by Euroamerican institutions and… Read More »Featured DH’er

On Collaboration: John Steinbeck’s America

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Share This: On Collaboration: John Steinbeck’s America Laurie Scrivener, Associate Professor and History and Area Studies Librarian Liorah Golomb, Associate Professor and Humanities Librarian Collaboration is the first of OU Libraries’ stated values: “We promote collaboration through teamwork and cooperation to pursue common goals.”1 As library faculty and members of the university community, we wholeheartedly agree. And, we have observed, collaboration is most effective when teams form organically to address a need or objective. A recent effort involving the Humanities librarian and the History and Area Studies librarian is a… Read More »On Collaboration: John Steinbeck’s America

Shelf Web Content Capture System: A Proposal for a Digital Scholarship Collaborative Clearinghouse at the University of Oklahoma

Share This: Shelf, a browser extension/add-on for Chrome and Firefox, describes itself as a “web clipper.” Think of it more like a team-based bookmark manager on crack — like Mario Party™ or Habitat for Humanity but as scrapbooking activities. Shelf not only allows you to pocket and organize links to web pages like traditional bookmark managers, but allows you to scrape pages for individual content types: articles, images, videos, people, organizations, clippings (click-and-drag excerpts of any portion of a page), and highlighted text selections. They become your web “gems.” You… Read More »Shelf Web Content Capture System: A Proposal for a Digital Scholarship Collaborative Clearinghouse at the University of Oklahoma

ArcGIS Story Maps and Map-lesses

Share This: The ArcGIS Story Maps apps (from ESRI) offer a dynamic set of mixed-media presentation forms that represent the best in intuitive usability and serve as an antidote for cartophilic creators previously deflated by the labyrinthine complexity of professional-grade GIS software. (like this … phew!) Just consider July 2017’s Story Map of the Month: Washington’s Ice Age Floods. It’s about as geo-mathematical as a National Geographic centerfold. Which may make it an ideal candidate for that ever-elusive, so seemingly simple, and yet so oft-unreachable, answer to two decades of… Read More »ArcGIS Story Maps and Map-lesses